Texas Instruments BA II Plus Professional Financial Calculator

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  • Handles both common math and various financial functions
  • Handles net future value, modified internal rate of return, and other advanced calculations
  • Approved for Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam
  • Ruggedly made with metal exterior and anti-slip rubber feet
  • Includes black protective case

The BA II Plus Professional calculator features all the great features of its predecessor while packing in even more time-saving functions to make short work of complex equations. It’s an ideal choice for entry level and advanced finance, accounting, economics, investment, statistics, and other business classes. It’s also a great choice to bring to the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam. Along with the standard capabilities of time-value-of-money, accrued interest, amortization, cost-sell-margin, and depreciation calculations, users can calculate more advanced business and finance related issues. It will handle net future value (NFV), modified internal rate of return (MIRR), modified duration, payback, discount payback, and more. Its rugged metal exterior, firm-touch keypad and anti-slip rubber feet make it ideal for anyone in accounting, economics, investing, statistics, and related businesses. It also comes with a black protective case.The BA II Plus Professional calculator features all the great features of its predecessor while packing in even more time-saving functions to make short work of complex equations. It’s an ideal choice for entry level and advanced finance, accounting, economics, investment, statistics, and other business classes. It’s also a great choice to bring to the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam. Along with the standard capabilities of time-value-of-money, accrued interest, amortization, cost-sell-margin, and depreciation calculations, users can calculate more advanced business and finance related issues. It will handle net future value (NFV), modified internal rate of return (MIRR), modified duration, payback, discount payback, and more. Its rugged metal exterior, firm-touch keypad and anti-slip rubber feet make it ideal for anyone in accounting, economics, investing, statistics, and related businesses. It also comes with a black protective case.

3 Responses to Texas Instruments BA II Plus Professional Financial Calculator

  1. J. Whitridge says:
    168 of 174 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Great product, cheap case, April 8, 2005
    By 
    J. Whitridge
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Texas Instruments BA II Plus Professional Financial Calculator (Office Product)
    OPENING NOTES:

    Just to clarify, this is a financial calculator, essentially the same calculator as the “Texas Instruments BA II Plus Advanced Financial Calculator” but with a cosmetic make-over.

    PROS:

    – Very attractive appearance.

    – Nice “firm-touch” keypad.

    – A couple of additional functions (compared to the BA II Plus Advanced).

    CONS:

    – Leatherette soft case instead of hard case.

    – Approx. $21 more (at time of writing) than BA II Plus Advanced.

    REVIEW:

    This is a very nice calculator. It is full-featured financial calculator with an attractive appearance. The brushed metal face has a polished metal inset to highlight the primary financial function buttons. I like the button layout (which is the same on both the Professional and Advanced models), and preferred it over that of the HP 10bII financial calculator, which I thought had poorly-marked non-financial functions.

    The calculator has a solid feel that is consistent with its metal look, and that is further reinforced by the “firm-touch” keypad. Personally, I like the feel of the firm-touch keys and prefer it over a regular keypad, as is found on the BA II Plus Advanced.

    My one complaint about the BA II Plus Professional (and the reason I rated it as 4 stars instead of 5) is that it has a soft case instead of a hard case. While the soft case will help protect from superficial marring, it won’t protect the calculator from impact or pressure damage, or from accidentally pressing buttons (such as “On”) when carrying it. For the extra $21 more than the Advanced model, it would be nice if the Professional model came with a case that will actually protect it.

    SUMMARY:

    – If you plan to keep your financial calculator around for a while or will use it a lot, and want something nice, then I would recommend this calculator. (I basically think of it as an investment in something I will continue to use for several years.)

    – If you think you would prefer a more firm-feeling keypad, then I would recommend this calculator.

    – If you are just buying a financial calculator for a finance class and don’t plan on getting much use out of it afterward, and don’t need the additional functions of the Professional version (which are advertised as being “Net Future Value (NFV), Modified Internal Rate of Return (MIRR), Modified Duration, Payback, and Discount Payback”), then I would recommend saving some bucks and getting the Advanced model of the BA II Plus.

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  2. Tim H. says:
    215 of 228 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Hit the ball out of the park, October 22, 2004
    By 
    Tim H. (Nevada) –

    This review is from: Texas Instruments BA II Plus Professional Financial Calculator (Office Product)
    Finally! This is a superb upgrade to TI’s previous BA II product. I hated the previous model with a passion given the near “touchless” keypad (allowing for frustrating key entry). THIS is the calculator that I would want to use for the CFA exam (did I mention how much I HATED the previous TI BA calculator??).

    For those thinking of the HP12C line, I had a 12C for many years and loved it. However, after it got ruined due to a playful two year old, I bought a new one and found it cheaply made compared to the one I bought in the 80’s (very disappointing) and have since abandoned using it. Interestingly, I found the following calculation example from a review of the HP 12C Platinum edition to be very interesting: “If possible, I would suggest that potential users and buyers try this data set on both the 12C and 12cP before buying. Clear register. Find [i] after input [PMT]=-1458;[FV]=0,[n]=84,[PV]=103600. The HP12C would take 20 seconds “running” while the HP12cP would take about 30 seconds to give the same answer [i]=0.4059!”

    How long for the BA II Plus Professional? I timed it at about one second.

    As calculators go, this is a mighty sweet device — especially given the clear HP-like display viewable at all angles!! Count me as a definite TI BA II convert!

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  3. Pruitt Hall says:
    110 of 117 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Easily better than ANY current HP–and 1/2 the price!, March 3, 2005
    By 
    Pruitt Hall (Cana, VA USA) –

    This review is from: Texas Instruments BA II Plus Professional Financial Calculator (Office Product)
    Have been a stalwart HP financial calculator user for over two decades…started with an HP41 in college with financial templates. I always admired HPs for the durable build, ease-of-use (once you got over the RPN hurdle) and displays. I finally needed to replace my over decade old HP 12C and the newer HPs simply do not impress me. Cheaper (as in WAY cheaper!) build…the HPs that came from Malaysia were fantastic calculators…solid keystrokes, superior grade of plastics, the whole nine yards. The newer HPs are made of a plastic that is a giant step backwards. The keys are now laughable, no ‘HP Feel’ to them at all.

    I took all of this in and thought to myself, ‘I guess everything is getting cheaper, nowadays…’. Then I ran a NPV calculation at the store and was downright shocked to see it ran slower than my old HP. The one thing I thought MIGHT save the purchase (i.e. cheaper plastic but faster processor) didn’t happen. I tried all of the newer HPs…the one display model of the OLDER HP12 (the non-Platinum model and still made in Malaysia) definitely runs TVM calculations quicker. This is NOT how to impress old bankers with a new product.

    Time to check out the Texas Instruments BA II Plus Professional. At first glance, to an old HP user, I thought it really LOOKED TI-ish; that is to say, very non-HP. But upon pressing a key or two, I was impressed that TI at least made an attempt at obtaining the old ‘HP Feel’ to their keys. Not as ‘pretty’ as HP’s angled keys, but good tactile feedback and get this: If you’ll hold up the TI BA II PP horizontally and sight down the keys, you’ll see they are actually angled! Nice touch, TI.

    Nicely laid out TVM section (my only reason for owning a financial calculator, thus supremely important to me) and intuitive to boot. Speed of calculation simply SMOKES current HPs…there is absolutely NO CONTEST. A complex Internal Rate of Return took two to three seconds. TI hasn’t been simply sitting around and ‘repackaging’ anything; whatever is under the hood of this calculator is current and fast.

    The rest of the calculator is nicely laid out…keys are pretty much TI convention, which to me is different. I miss a prominent ENTER key.

    Likes: I like TI’s ‘CHAIN’ calculation mode. It’s similar to RPN without the ENTER keystroke. Remember this if this is your first financial calculator: Most financial calculations are run in CHAIN or RPN mode (and, sadly, no, the TI doesn’t support TRUE RPN), not the Algebraic Operation System (AOS). To TI’s credit, the calculator defaults to CHAIN calculation (for newbies, this just means that the calculator runs the operation AS IT IS ENTERED; NOT following Algebraic heirarchy of operations). But it is nice that TI recognizes how financial people enter calculations and, unlike other TI calculators, AOS is NOT the default entry mode.

    Love the fact that the compounding rate is defaulted to 1, not 12 (HPs always default to 12). Love the fact that interest is always entered as a whole interest number (it divides it for you, automatically). Good, not great, manual. Battery access is very easy. Quality looks genuinely good, but time will be the only final arbiter on this one, but the product appears to be (in my highest compliment) equal to older HPs in every respect.

    Dislikes? Quibbling ones to be sure, but the compounding rate mentioned above is a pain to get too; I must have looked 30 minutes in the manual to finally find it (hint: you have to use the Down Arrow key to roll through a series of selections to get it…and it’s NOT the first choice). Wish for (on all financial calculators, not just TI) normal AA or AAA batteries…why the manufacturers have to insist on the round, hearing aid style battery is beyond me. I mean, really, how big is a AAA battery?

    Wish TI would step up to the plate and offer some mortgage/realty functions in a financial calculator without forcing a user to own 2 calculators. Wish it were programmable, which is just a follow-on to the mortgage/realty/specialized functions.

    If TI offered this same model with enhanced functions, programmability and a normal battery, HP could give up the calculator market.

    As it stands, a worthy heir to the older HP calculators. I’m sorry to see HP cheapen the product so badly, but TI will gain market share on this one. A solid keeper.

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