Straight Outta Compton (Blu-ray + DVD + DIGITAL HD with Ultraviolet)

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Straight Outta Compton tells the true story of how 5 young men, using brutally honest rhymes, put their anger about life into the most powerful weapon they had: their music.

3 Responses to Straight Outta Compton (Blu-ray + DVD + DIGITAL HD with Ultraviolet)

  1. Paul Allaer says:
    39 of 46 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Outstanding bio-pic on N.W.A delivers at all levels, August 14, 2015
    By 
    Paul Allaer (Cincinnati) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      

    “Straight Outta Compton” (2015 release; 147 min.) brings the story of the mega-influential hip-hop group N.W.A. As the movie opens, we hear radio and TV snippets over the opening credits about “the war on drugs” and the “crack epidemic in America”. After the opening credits, we are reminded that this is “Compton, CA, 1986”. During the initial 20 min. or so, we get to know how N.W.A’s five members (Dr. Dre, Easy E, Ice Cube, DJ Yella, and MC Ren) all live in Compton and are dealing with various problems (the police being one, obviously), and how N.W.A eventually came into being. To tell you more would spoil your viewing experience, you’ll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

    Couple of comments: the movie is directed by F. Gary Gray, previously best known for directing “The Negotiator” and “The Italian Job”. With all due respect for those earlier movies, what Gray has accomplished with “Straight Outta Compton” is in another league altogether. I should mention that I’m not particularly a fan of hip-hop music. That, and the movie’s 2 1/2 hr. running time, almost kept me from going to see this. But given the almost universal critical claim this movie has been gathering, and the fact that I love music in general, including musical bio-pics and documentaries (such as the recent Brian Wilson “Love and Mercy” bio-pic and the Amy Winehouse doc called “AMY”), I decided I needed to check out what the buzz was all about. So glad I did. “Straight Outta Compton” is almost epic, covering the years 1986 to 1995, and a lot of ground is covered indeed. All of the classic moments are here, including of course the immediate incident leading to the band making “F Tha Police”, their seminal 1989 tour at the top of their game (and fame), and on and on. The biggest surprise of the movie for me is the fairly large amount of screen time for Suge Knight, whom we see entice, intimidate, cajole, threaten, bully and outright force himself onto the West Coast hip hop scene (and he is of course as we speak held on a murder charge). The acting performances are top-notch throughout, including O’Shea Jackson, Jr. as Ice Cube (Ice Cube’s real-life son, incidentally), Corey Hawkins as Dr. Dre and Jason Mitchell as Eazy E. Bottom line: these 2 1/2 hours just flew by.

    The movie opened today, and the early evening screening where I saw this at was quite well attended. We here in Cincinnati got an extra jolt when at some point, when N.W.A was on the 1989 tour, we see a brief reenactment of their show at Riverfront Coliseum (nowadays known as US Bank Arena). When the end titles started rolling, there was a spontaneous applause from the audience, just to give you an idea how well the movie was received at this screening. Bottom line: if you love music (even without being a big hip-hop fan), you will not want to miss this, and I’d readily suggest you check this out, be it in the theater, on Amazon Instant or eventually on DVD/Blu-ray. “Straight Outta Compton” is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

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  2. Rachel McElhany says:
    23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Straight Outta Compton, September 13, 2015
    By 
    Rachel McElhany
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: Straight Outta Compton (Blu-ray + DVD + DIGITAL HD with Ultraviolet) (Blu-ray)
    Normally I don’t write movie reviews for movies that aren’t an adaptation of a book, but I feel compelled to review Straight Outta Compton because it blew me away. I was a fan of NWA and other gansta rap acts in high school and college but I didn’t know too much about the behind the scenes goings on. This movie covers when NWA first came together in 1986 up through the early 90s.

    NWA is probably most known for their song F*** the Police. The movie shows the tension between the police and the black community at that time and the racism that the group members individually experienced that led to Ice Cube writing this song. If you can get over the shock of the song’s title and listen to the lyrics, you’ll realize that not much has changed, especially recently with the Black Lives Matter movement and the incidents that inspired its creation.

    I was surprised at how emotional I felt watching this movie. From the incidents of racism to the group’s relationship with each other and their manager. Tears were streaming down my face towards the end. My husband was not a fan of gansta rap or NWA and told me that not everyone knows of the tragedy that made me cry – he didn’t for sure – so I won’t spoil it for you.

    The casting in this film was great. Ice Cube’s son, O’Shea Jackson Jr., plays him. Not only is he a great actor, he looks just like his father- especially later in the film when he doesn’t have Jehri curls anymore. Corey Hawkins plays Dr. Dre and the resemblance is uncanny.

    The one criticism I have is that the movie didn’t go deep enough. A lot of events were left out or skimmed over. But here’s the thing, a lot happened to NWA and to the gansta rap genre that they were instrumental in creating. The industry was one big soap opera. The movie is already two and a half hours long. It would have to be a mini-series to get everything in. Or a separate biopic for each artist. As is, I think what the writers and director have chosen to highlight are the right things.

    I felt so nostalgic driving home from this movie. I wanted to get out my old CDs and listen to them. Then I remembered that small children live in my house and there’s a reason why those CDs are packed away! Someday…

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  3. Paul Donovan says:
    50 of 64 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    A great piece of cinema, if not history, August 16, 2015
    By 
    Paul Donovan
    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: Straight Outta Compton (Blu-ray + DVD + DIGITAL HD with Ultraviolet) (Blu-ray)
    Nine Things About the Movie “Straight Outta Compton”

    1.This movie is an interesting, intelligent – and kind of revisionist – history of the rise and fall of revolutionary hip-hop group N.W.A., and the way they punched America in the face.

    2. The movie starts in 1986, when five young men in Compton, California, form a loose group to develop and play what they call “reality rap” to play in local clubs. When music manager Jerry Heller discovers them, he helps to make them famous.

    3. The movie is really about the clash of two ruthless cultures: urban black street life and the music business. It does a great job of weaving American music history, contemporary culture, and interpersonal relationships together. It is not preachy, nor is it angry. It’s a real, legit movie.

    4. The five main actors are pretty unknown, but they do a great job handling such iconic characters. I was especially impressed by Jason Mitchell, who played Eazy-E. And to be honest, I wasn’t expecting much out of O’Shea Jackson, Jr., but he surprised me by how well he played his own real-life father.

    5. Considering how much of the group’s history and lifestyle is common knowledge, it is fascinating (and disappointing) to see it being re-written right in front of our eyes. This movie is also an attempt to romanticize and make a new hero-myth out of a legitimately controversial group.

    6. The group was well-known for their song “F*** the Police”, which became kind of an anthem for disaffected urban youth. It serves a prominent role in the movie. But they were also just as well-known for their horrific attitudes towards women – they really helped solidify sexist rape culture in hip-hop. The movie does not play the song “One Less B***h”, which is about gang-raping and killing women.

    7. Dr. Dre, who co-produced the movie, is receiving a fair amount of criticism for using the movie to erase the history of his own troubles with women. Perhaps the most infamous incident – when he picked up journalist Dee Barnes by the hair and repeatedly bashed her face into a wall – was not even mentioned.

    8. The concert scene in Detroit, when the group was arrested after playing “F*** the Police”, is a nice piece of cinema, and portrays the group as unofficial heroes of free speech. It also never happened.

    9. If you can separate the screenplay from the history, and focus on the movie itself, this is a great film. It’s a unique American epic, and shows that some of the issues America faced in the late 1980’s haven’t progressed very far. There is enough historical authenticity to be educational as well as entertaining. Just keep in mind that in the end, this movie is focused on entertainment.

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